Fertility & pregnancy


Sometimes tiredness causes women to reduce their physical activity. Sometimes women worry about the effects of exercise on their baby...

Exercise & physical activity

Sometimes tiredness causes women to reduce their physical activity. Sometimes women worry about the effects of exercise on their baby... Find out more →

Women should not be dieting when they are pregnant. Certain nutrition needs must be met during pregnancy; strict dieting puts that at risk.

Nutrition & pregnancy

Women should not be dieting when they are pregnant. Certain nutrition needs must be met during pregnancy; strict dieting puts that at risk. Find out more →

Increasing age can affect your pregnancy in different ways, including increasing the chance of miscarriage and stillbirth...

Pregnancy & ageing

Increasing age can affect your pregnancy in different ways, including increasing the chance of miscarriage and stillbirth... Find out more →

Fertility is your ability to produce a child. Infertility is when you have had 12 months of unprotected sexual intercourse and you have not become pregnant. Fertility can be affected by many things and there are also ways to increase your chances of becoming pregnant. Not being able to conceive can be distressing but talking with your doctor, counsellor or psychologist can help you to understand your options and decide what to do next.

When you are pregnant, a healthy and nutritious diet, managing your weight and being aware of the things that affect your pregnancy can help you to be the healthiest you can possibly be and reduce complications such as hypertension, pre-eclampsia and gestational diabetes.

Alternatively, there are times when you may want to avoid a pregnancy and there are many different forms of contraception to suit each woman's own needs.


Fertility

Fertility is your ability to produce a child. Infertility is when you have had 12 months of unprotected sexual intercourse and you have not become pregnant. Fertility can be affected by illness, how old you are, your weight, whether you or your partner smokes, or takes drugs, or even perhaps consumes too much caffeine. Sexually transmissible infections (STIs) can also affect fertility.

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Avoiding pregnancy

Using contraception the right way increases your chances of avoiding a pregnancy. There are many different forms of contraception including the oral contraceptive pill, a 'rod', intrauterine device (IUD), diaphragm and cervical cap, condom and the natural family planning method.

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Trying for pregnancy

When you start trying for a baby there are many things that can be helpful to know. This includes understanding about ovulation and when is the best time to try for conception, perhaps using an ovulation calculator or predictor kit, and also being the healthiest you can possibly be.

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Having trouble conceiving

Having trouble getting pregnant can be caused by many things including problems with ovulation, blocked fallopian tubes, endometriosis, PCOS, premature menopause, fibroids, thyroid problems and a condition called Turner syndrome. Depending on the cause there are a number of treatment options. 

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Infertility treatment

There are many reasons a woman may have difficulty becoming pregnant. There are a number of things you can do to increase the likelihood of becoming pregnant including lifestyle changes, surgery, hormone treatment and Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART).

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Fertility problems & emotions

Worry, sadness, distress, anger are common feelings experienced by women who are having fertility problems. Having fertility treatments such as in vitro fertilisation (IVF) can further add to emotional distress. Talking to a doctor, counsellor or psychologist can be helpful in coping with these emotions and deciding what to do next.

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Pregnancy & health

Being the healthiest you can be when you are pregnant includes having a healthy and nutritious diet and including key nutrients like calcium and folate. Taking care of your pelvic floor muscles is another important aspect of pregnancy and future health.

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Pregnancy & weight

Managing your weight while you are pregnant is not always easy. Knowing how much weight gain and what you can do to keep active is helpful. Hypertension, pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, and the need for an induced birth are all risks of gaining too much weight or being overweight in pregnancy, but there are many things you can do to help.

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Pregnancy & ageing

Women are waiting longer to have their first baby mostly because timing or a woman's individual situation doesn't make it right quite yet. This is understandable, but it is important to know that increasing age can affect your pregnancy in different ways including increasing the chance of miscarriage, stillbirth and problems with the placenta.

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Gestational diabetes

Gestational diabetes is diabetes that develops during pregnancy and usually goes away after the baby is born. It is recommended that all women are screened for gestational diabetes between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Women who have had gestational diabetes are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. To prevent or reduce your risk of developing gestational diabetes and further complications there are many things you can do.

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